Question: What Happened Waitangi Day 1840?

What happened before the Treaty of Waitangi?

The history of Māori migration and settlement in Aotearoa and the stories of Te Ao Māori (The Māori World) have been retained in the oral histories of each iwi (tribe) and hapu (sub-tribe).

Histories of the Māori people are told in the creation stories..

How was the Treaty of Waitangi affect us today?

The Treaty was a contract of respect between the British and Māori. Today, there are a lot of people living here whose families are not from Britain. The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori.

Why did the British want New Zealand?

Britain was motivated by the desire to forestall the New Zealand Company and other European powers (France established a very small settlement at Akaroa in the South Island later in 1840), to facilitate settlement by British subjects and, possibly, to end the lawlessness of European (predominantly British and American) …

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important in education?

The Treaty of Waitangi principle calls for schools to understand and honour Treaty principles in all actions and decision making. It is about making our country’s bicultural foundations evident in school policies, organisation, physical spaces, whānau and community engagement, and classroom planning and assessment.

What happened in 1840 in NZ?

1840 is considered a watershed year in the history of New Zealand: The Treaty of Waitangi is signed, British sovereignty over New Zealand is proclaimed, organised European settlement begins, and Auckland and Wellington are both founded.

What has Waitangi Day become to some people since the 1970’s?

The Waitangi Day Act 1960 declared 6 February to be Waitangi Day; a national day of thanksgiving in commemoration of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. Waitangi Day, a public holiday from 1974, briefly became New Zealand Day in the 1970s. Increasingly, it became a focus for Māori protest activities.

What went wrong with the Treaty of Waitangi?

The land was lost through a combination of private and Government purchases, outright confiscation, and Native Land Court practices that made it difficult for Māori to maintain their land under traditional ownership structures. There were some purchases of Māori land made before the Treaty was signed.

What is taonga mean?

Taonga (taoka in South Island Māori) is a Māori language word which refers to a treasured possession in Māori culture. … Intangible examples may include language and spiritual beliefs.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi so important?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected.

Who did the Treaty of Waitangi affect?

What is the Treaty of Waitangi? The Treaty of Waitangi was a written agreement made in 1840 between the British Crown (the monarch) and more than 500 Māori chiefs. After that, New Zealand became a colony of Britain and Māori became British subjects.

Who is the richest New Zealander?

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Is New Zealand still a British colony?

New Zealand officially became a separate colony within the British Empire, severing its link to New South Wales.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi fair?

Colonists believed the Treaty of Waitangi was fair because it offered Māori the rights of British citizens. The signing of the Treaty made it easier for settlers to acquire land. … Pākehā took sides with Māori and were known as ‘philo-Māori’ or Pākehā–Māori.

What does Article 3 of the Treaty of Waitangi mean?

Treaty of Waitangi (3) Article 3. This is the arrangement for the consent to the governorship of the Queen. The Queen will protect all the Māori people of New Zealand, and give them all the same rights as those of the people of England.

What is the significance of the 1840 Treaty of Waitangi?

British sovereignty over the country was proclaimed on 21 May 1840. The Treaty is a broad statement of principles on which the British and Māori made a political compact to found a nation state and build a government in New Zealand.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi mean?

Te Tiriti o Waitangi) is an important agreement that was signed by representatives of the British Crown and Māori in 1840. … The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

What are the key principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The principles of partnership, participation and protection underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi.