Question: Which Nursing Intervention Is Appropriate For A Client With A Closed Reduction Extremity Fracture?

Which immobilization device is best for a patient with an unstable wrist fracture?

Which type of cast is best for a patient with an unstable wrist fracture.

The long arm cast is commonly used for stable forearm or elbow fractures and unstable wrist fractures.

It is similar to the short arm cast but extends to the proximal humerus, restricting motion at the wrist and the elbow..

Which nursing intervention is appropriate for monitoring the client for the development of Volkmann’s contracture?

occurs through an area of diseased bone. Which nursing intervention is appropriate for monitoring the client for the development of Volkmann’s contracture? Assess the radial pulse. An important nursing assessment, post fracture, is to evaluate neurovascular status.

What factors may contribute to compartment syndrome?

Risk factors for development of a compartment syndrome include fractures of the tibia, forearm, and elbow; crush injuries; bleeding disorders such as hemophilia; ipsilateral forearm and elbow injuries; and open fractures.

How long is recovery from plate and screws in wrist?

The metal plate and screws allow people to start using the wrist earlier. Motion and light use of the wrist are started ~2 weeks after surgery. Once the bone has healed (~6 weeks), more vigorous activities are allowed.

What happens if you don’t treat compartment syndrome?

Compartment syndrome can develop when there’s bleeding or swelling within a compartment. This can cause pressure to build up inside the compartment, which can prevent blood flow. It can cause permanent damage if left untreated, as the muscles and nerves won’t get the nutrients and oxygen they need.

Which of the following refers to a blunt force injury to soft tissue?

A contusion (bruise) is an injury to the soft tissue often produced by a blunt force, such as a kick, fall, or blow. The result will be pain, swelling, and discoloration because of bleeding into the tissue. Treatment for contusions includes rest, ice, compression, and elevation (R.I.C.E.).

What is a closed fracture of the wrist?

A wrist fracture can mean that a person has broken one of the small (carpal) bones in this joint or, more commonly, the distal radius, which is the larger of the two bones that make up the forearm. This bone most often breaks at the lower end, near where it connects to the bones of the hand and thumb.

What is the hallmark sign of compartment syndrome?

There are five characteristic signs and symptoms related to acute compartment syndrome: pain, paraesthesia (reduced sensation), paralysis, pallor, and pulselessness. Pain and paresthesia are the early symptoms of compartment syndrome.

Which may occur if a client experiences compartment syndrome in an upper extremity?

Which of the following may occur if a client experiences compartment syndrome in an upper extremity? Explanation: If compartment syndrome occurs in an upper extremity, it may lead to Volkmann’s contracture, a clawlike deformity of the hand resulting from obstructed arterial blood flow to the forearm and hand.

Which type of fracture is one in which the skin or mucous membrane wound extends to the fractured bone?

An open fracture is one in which the skin or mucous membrane wound extends to the fractured bone.

Which signs and symptoms would the nurse find in a patient with compartment syndrome quizlet?

Signs and symptoms of compartment syndrome are pain with touch or movement not relieved with opioid pain medication, edema, pallor, weak or unequal pulses, cyanosis, tingling, numbness, and paresthesia.

Which nursing intervention is essential in caring for a client with compartment syndrome quizlet?

Which nursing intervention is essential in caring for a client with compartment syndrome? Explanation: Nursing measures should include removing all clothing, jewelry, and external forms of pressure (such as dressings or casts) to prevent constriction and additional tissue compromise.

How painful is a distal radius fracture?

When you have a distal radius fracture, you will almost always have a history of a fall or some other kind of trauma. You will usually have pain and swelling in the forearm or wrist. You may have a deformity in the shape of the wrist if the fracture is bad enough.

How long do you have to wear a brace after wrist surgery?

After the surgery, a splint will be placed for two weeks until your first follow-up visit. At that time, the splint will be removed and exchanged with a removable wrist splint. You will have to wear it for four weeks.

What is the fastest way to heal a broken wrist?

Seven Recovery Tips for Broken Wrist InjuriesElevate Your Wrist. To reduce swelling and pain, raise your wrist so it’s above your heart. … Apply Ice. … Use Pain-Relieving Medication. … Exercise Joints Near the Wrist. … Keep Your Cast Dry. … Work With a Physical Therapist. … Visit Your Doctor for a Follow-Up.

What is the most reliable indication of compartment syndrome in a patient who is unconscious?

Acute compartment syndromes usually present within 48 hours of injury. A high index of suspicion is required, especially with an unconscious patient following major trauma. Clinical features include: Increasing pain despite immobilisation of the fracture.

Which intervention should the nurse implement when caring for the client who complains of phantom limb pain two months after amputation?

occurs through an area of diseased bone. Which intervention should the nurse implement when caring for the client who complains of phantom limb pain two months after amputation? Reassure the client that phantom pain is common. A client sustains an injury to the ligaments surrounding a joint.