Why Are There Two Versions Of The Treaty Of Waitangi?

Which Chiefs did not sign the Treaty of Waitangi?

Saying ‘no’ Taraia Ngakuti Te Tumuhuia, a Ngāti Tamaterā leader in the Thames area, was one of several rangatira who declined to sign the Treaty.

Others included Ngāi Te Rangi leader Tupaea of Tauranga, Te Wherowhero of Waikato-Tainui, and Mananui Te Heuheu of Ngāti Tūwharetoa..

Who signed the Treaty of Waitangi first?

Hone Heke6 February 1840 Hone Heke was the first to sign. That day at Waitangi, about 40 rangatira signed the Treaty.

What does Treaty mean?

Treaty, a binding formal agreement, contract, or other written instrument that establishes obligations between two or more subjects of international law (primarily states and international organizations).

What two groups was the Treaty of Waitangi between?

The Treaty is an agreement, in Māori and English, that was made between the British Crown and about 540 Māori rangatira (chiefs).

What are the key principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The principles of partnership, participation and protection underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important in education?

The Treaty of Waitangi principle calls for schools to understand and honour Treaty principles in all actions and decision making. It is about making our country’s bicultural foundations evident in school policies, organisation, physical spaces, whānau and community engagement, and classroom planning and assessment.

What really happened Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty of Waitangi is an agreement made in 1840 between representatives of the British Crown and more than 500 Māori chiefs. It resulted in the declaration of British sovereignty over New Zealand by Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson in May 1840. Most chiefs signed a Māori-language version of the treaty.

What does Article 2 of the Treaty of Waitangi mean?

Article Two Māori agreed to give the Crown a right to deal with them over land transactions. English: confirmed and guaranteed to the chiefs ‘exclusive and undisturbed possession of their lands and estates, forests, fisheries, and other properties’.

What was NZ like before the treaty?

The history of Māori migration and settlement in Aotearoa and the stories of Te Ao Māori (The Māori World) have been retained in the oral histories of each iwi (tribe) and hapu (sub-tribe). Histories of the Māori people are told in the creation stories.

When were the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi developed?

1989Treaty principles developed by the Crown In 1989 the fourth Labour government became the first New Zealand government to set out principles to guide its actions on matters relating to the treaty. These principles were: the government has the right to govern and make laws.

Why is the concept of the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi problematic?

Why is the concept of ‘the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi’ problematic? It is problematic because it is not clear who defines the principles. The government had both versions of the treaty and then looked for common ground. … The Prendergast ruling dominated treaty jurisprudence for 70 years.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi fair?

Colonists believed the Treaty of Waitangi was fair because it offered Māori the rights of British citizens. The signing of the Treaty made it easier for settlers to acquire land. … Pākehā took sides with Māori and were known as ‘philo-Māori’ or Pākehā–Māori.

How many versions of the Treaty of Waitangi are there?

two versionsThere are two versions of the Treaty – an English version and a Māori language version translated by Henry and Edward Williams.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi still valid today?

The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 and was an agreement between the British Crown and a large number of Māori chiefs. Today the Treaty is widely accepted to be a constitutional document that establishes and guides the relationship between the Crown in New Zealand (embodied by our government) and Māori.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi so important?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected. It does that by: … making the Government responsible for helping to address grievances.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi mean?

Te Tiriti o Waitangi) is an important agreement that was signed by representatives of the British Crown and Māori in 1840. … The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

“Currently the formal legal position of the Treaty of Waitangi is that it is legally effective in the New Zealand Courts to the extent that it is recognised in Acts of Parliament. The Treaty of Waitangi has no independent legal status.

Is there more than one version of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Legally there is just one Treaty, despite the differences between the two texts. The Waitangi Tribunal has exclusive authority to determine the meaning of the Treaty in the two texts and to decide issues raised by the differences between them.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

Why did Britain want a treaty with New Zealand?

Most signed a Māori-language version. Reasons why chiefs signed the treaty included wanting controls on sales of Māori land to Europeans, and on European settlers. They also wanted to trade with Europeans, and believed the new relationship with Britain would stop fighting between tribes.